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BIBLIOTHÈQUE
Bach, Johann Sebastian Johann Sebastian Bach
Allemagne Allemagne
(1685 - 1750)

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Louis Moyse Flute Collection
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Bach, Johann Sebastian: Aria: "Meine Seele, auf, erzähle" for Woodwind Quartet

Aria: "Meine Seele, auf, erzähle" for Woodwind Quartet
BWV 69 No 3
Johann Sebastian Bach




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Compositeur :Johann Sebastian BachBach, Johann Sebastian (1685 - 1750)
Instrumentation :

Quatuor : Flūte, Hautbois, Clarinette, Basson

Genre :

Baroque

Arrangeur :
Editeur :
Johann Sebastian BachMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Droit d'auteur :Public Domain
Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele (Praise the Lord, my soul), BWV 69a, is a church cantata by Johann Sebastian Bach. He composed it in 1723 in Leipzig for the twelfth Sunday after Trinity and first performed it on 15 August 1723. It is part of his first annual cycle of cantatas.

Bach wrote the cantata in his first year in Leipzig, which he had started after Trinity of 1723, for the Twelfth Sunday after Trinity. The prescribed readings for the Sunday were from the Second Epistle to the Corinthians, the ministry of the Spirit (2 Corinthians 3:4–11), and from the Gospel of Mark, the healing of a deaf mute man (Mark 7:31–37). The unknown poet referred to the gospel, but saw in the healing more generally God constantly doing good for man. The opening chorus is therefore taken from Psalms 103:2, "Praise the Lord, my soul, and do not forget the good He has done for you". The poetry refers to "telling" several times, related to the healed man's ability to speak: "Ah, that I had a thousand tongues!" (movement 2), "My soul, arise! tell" (movement 3) and "My mouth is weak, my tongue mute to speak Your praise and honor" (movement 4). Several movements rely on words of a cantata by Johann Oswald Knauer, published in 1720 in Gott-geheiligtes Singen und Spielen des Friedensteinischen Zions in Gotha. The closing chorale picks up the theme in the sixth verse of Samuel Rodigast's hymn "Was Gott tut, das ist wohlgetan" (What God does, is well done) (1675).

Bach first performed the cantata on 15 August 1723. He performed it again around 1727, revised the instrumentation of an aria, and used it in his last years for a cantata for a Ratswahl ceremony, the inauguration of the town council at church, Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele, BWV 69.

Bach reflected the duality within the words of the psalm in the opening chorus by creating a double fugue. Both themes of the movement in D Major are handled separately first and then combined. In the first aria, a pastoral movement, the tenor is accompanied by oboe da caccia, recorder and bassoon. In a later version around 1727 Bach changed the instrumentation to alto, oboe and violin, possibly because he did not have players at hand for the first woodwind setting. In the second aria the contrast of Leiden (suffering) and Freuden (joy) is expressed by chromatic, first down, then up, and vivid coloraturas. The closing chorale is the same as the one of Weinen, Klagen, Sorgen, Zagen, BWV 12, of 1714, but for no apparent reason without the obbligato violin.

To express the praise of the words, the cantata is festively scored for soprano, alto, tenor and bass soloists and a four-part choir, three trumpets, timpani, three oboes, oboe da caccia, oboe d'amore, recorder, bassoon, two violins, viola, and basso continuo.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobe_den_Herrn,_meine_Se ele,_BWV_69a).

I created this arrangement for Woodwind Quartet (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet & Bassoon).
Source / Web :MuseScore
Ajoutée par magataganm le 2015-07-01
Partition centrale :Lobe den Herrn, meine Seele, 69 (4 partitions)



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Cette partition est associée ą la collection de magataganm :
flûte
flûte
Dispositions Flute
Liste des partitions :
› Élévation from 30 Pièces pour Orgue for Flute & Strings
› "Matribus suis dixerunt" for Woodwind Quintet
› "2 Alma Redemptoris Mater" for Woodwinds & Strings - Vents et Quintet ą cordes
› "3 Gradualia" for Winds & Strings - Vents & Orchestre Cordes
› "A Christmas Air" for Flutes & Harp - Flute et Harpe
› "A Cup of Tea" Reel for Flute - Flūte seule
› "A Dieu Celle" for Woodwind Sextet - Sextuor ą vent.
› "A Pretty Maid Milking the Cow" for Flute, Oboe & Harp - Flūte, Hautbois, Harpe
› "A Swiss Melody" for Flute Quartet - Quatuor de Flūtes
› "Abendlied" for Woodwind Quartet - Quatuor ą vent






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