MUSICOTHÈQUE

Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy
Allemagne Allemagne
(1809 - 1847)
831 partitions
427 MP3 206 MIDI

ARRANGEURS :
› Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix Original 3
› Czerny, Carl 1
› Grützmacher, Friedrich 1
› Heidtmann, Klaus 3
› Lickl, Carl Georg 1

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Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix



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Partitions Flute › Flūte, Hautbois, Guitare › Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy
Mendelssohn Bartholdy, Felix:

"Venetian Gondola Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" for Flute, Oboe & Guitar
Op. 30 No. 6
Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy



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Télécharger MP3 : "Venetian Gondola Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 6) for Flute, Oboe & Guitar 24x 393x

Compositeur :Felix Mendelssohn BartholdyFelix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 - 1847)
Instrumentation :

Flūte, Hautbois, Guitare

Genre :

Romantique

Arrangeur :
Editeur :
Felix Mendelssohn BartholdyMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Date :1834
Droit d'auteur :Public Domain
Jakob Ludwig Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy (1809 – 1847), born and widely known as Felix Mendelssohn, was a German composer, pianist, organist and conductor of the early romantic period. Mendelssohn wrote symphonies, concertos, oratorios, piano music and chamber music. His best-known works include his Overture and incidental music for A Midsummer Night's Dream, the Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, the overture The Hebrides, his mature Violin Concerto, and his String Octet. His Songs Without Words are his most famous solo piano compositions. After a long period of relative denigration due to changing musical tastes and antisemitism in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, his creative originality has been re-evaluated. He is now among the most popular composers of the romantic era.

Mendelssohn enjoyed early success in Germany, and revived interest in the music of Johann Sebastian Bach, notably with his performance of the St Matthew Passion in 1829. He became well received in his travels throughout Europe as a composer, conductor and soloist; his ten visits to Britain – during which many of his major works were premiered – form an important part of his adult career. His essentially conservative musical tastes set him apart from more adventurous musical contemporaries such as Franz Liszt, Richard Wagner, Charles-Valentin Alkan and Hector Berlioz. The Leipzig Conservatoire, which he founded, became a bastion of this anti-radical outlook.

He was not a newcomer to the piano miniature when he published his Lieder ohne Worte, Op. 30, in 1835. In addition to a number of other short works for solo piano bearing various generic titles, Mendelssohn had composed one earlier set of six lyrical piano character pieces (Op. 19) which were first published by London's premier music publisher Novello in 1832 under the title "Original Melodies" (and a few months later in Berlin by Simrock under the title "Romanzen für's Pianoforte"), and which became immediately popular in Europe's salon culture. Opus 30 was the first group of Mendelssohn's piano character pieces to be published with the original title Lieder ohne Worte, a designation that raises tantalizing aesthetic issues by presuming to cross the line between absolute and program music and suggesting the frustration of generic expectations.

The contrapuntal textures, simple, lyrical melodies, and elaborations of Classical phrase structures and forms in the Op. 30 Songs without Words reveal Mendelssohn's musical upbringing in the great Classical traditions. The inner voices in Op. 30, No. 1 combine in a single strand of gentle arpeggio figuration between the harmonic foundation of the bass and the lyrical tune. Like No. 1, the second piece in the set is also a variation of the ternary form idea. The classically balanced antecedent-consequent period that begins the piece modulates from B flat minor to the relative major (D flat major), foreshadowing the large-scale tonal progression from B flat minor to B flat major over the course of the piece. In Op. 30, No. 3, the identical introduction and coda feature delicate arpeggios and bookend an unassuming modified ternary form movement. The repose of this piece is broken by the minor mode and ceaseless sixteenth notes of Op. 30, No. 4. Indeed, although the opening phrase of this piece begins as a classic antecedent phrase, the following phrase cannot find rest in its tortuous extensions and cadential evasions, and modulates to the relative major key. By including an A section in which two themes are introduced and a brief developmental B section before the modified reprise of the A section, Mendelssohn combines elements of ternary and sonata forms. The D major tonality of Op. 30, No. 5 links it to the preceding piece. Filigree thirty-second notes buzz beneath the melody. Mendelssohn entitled Op. 30, No. 6 "Venetianisches Gondellied," as he had Op. 19, No. 6 and as he would Op. 62, No. 5 in 1844. Although in his earlier and later Venetian gondola "songs" the 6/8 meter functions as a straightforward indicator of the genre, in Op. 30, No. 6, Mendelssohn frustrates generic expectations through metric ambiguity. The accentuating chords in the eighth-note accompaniment blur the line between 6/8 and 3/4 time. Additionally, the right-hand melody, which, in the A-section, studiously avoids the tonic pitch, floats incongruently over the metric confusion of the accompaniment. In the coda, ponderous chordal syncopations in the right hand exaggerate the metric conflict, temporarily subverting any clear sense of meter.

Source: AllMusic (https://www.allmusic.com/composition/songs-without-wor ds-6-for-piano-book-2-op-30-mc0002393370 ).

Although originally composed for Piano, I created this Interpretation of the "Venetian Gondola Song" from "Lieder ohne Worte" (Op. 30 No. 6) for Flute, Oboe & Classical Guitar.
Source / Web :MuseScore
Ajoutée par magataganm, 10 Déc 2018
Partition centrale :Romances sans paroles - Livre 2, 30 (33 partitions)
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Cette partition est associée ą la collection de magataganm :
flûte
flûte
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› Élévation from 30 Pièces pour Orgue for Flute & Strings
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› Intrada V: "Ach Gott, vom Himmel sieh darein" for Wind Sextet
› Quintet in F Major for Flute & Piano
› 'Entr'acte' from 'Carmen' for Flute & Classical Guitar
› Élégie for Flute & Strings
› ¿Porque, eh? from "Two Cuban Dances" for Flute & Piano
› "À Chloris" in E Major for Flute & Piano
› "2 Alma Redemptoris Mater" for Woodwinds & Strings - Vents et Quintet ą cordes





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