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BIBLIOTHÈQUE
Gabrieli, Giovanni Giovanni Gabrieli
Italie Italie
(1557 - 1612)

36 Partitions
16 MP3
22 MIDI





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Partitions Orchestre › Vents & Orchestre Cordes › Giovanni Gabrieli
Gabrieli, Giovanni: Sonata "Pian e Forte for Winds & Strings

Sonata "Pian e Forte for Winds & Strings
Ch. 175
Giovanni Gabrieli




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EcouterTélécharger MP3 : Sonata "Pian e Forte (Ch. 175) for Winds & Strings 1x 4x VoirTélécharger PDF : Sonata "Pian e Forte (Ch. 175) for Winds & Strings (14 pages - 273.15 Ko)0x
VoirTélécharger PDF : Bassoon (61.34 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Cello (60.86 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : English Horn (62.9 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Flute (64.56 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Oboe (62.8 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Viola (63.6 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Violin 1 (63.76 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Violin 2 (62.17 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Full Score (164.95 Ko)
 

 
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Compositeur :Giovanni GabrieliGiovanni Gabrieli (1557 - 1612)
Instrumentation :

Vents & Orchestre Cordes

Genre :

Renaissance

Arrangeur :
Editeur :
Giovanni GabrieliMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Droit d'auteur :Public Domain
Giovanni Gabrieli (c. 1554/57 – 1612) was an Italian composer and organist. He was one of the most influential musicians of his time, and represents the culmination of the style of the Venetian School, at the time of the shift from Renaissance to Baroque idioms.

Gabrieli was born in Venice. He was one of five children, and his father came from the region of Carnia and went to Venice shortly before Giovanni's birth. While not much is known about Giovanni's early life, he probably studied with his uncle, the composer Andrea Gabrieli, who was employed at St Mark's Basilica from the 1560s until his death in 1585. Giovanni may indeed have been brought up by his uncle, as is implied by the dedication to his 1587 book of concerti, in which he described himself as "little less than a son" to his uncle.

Giovanni also went to Munich to study with the renowned Orlando de Lassus at the court of Duke Albert V; most likely he stayed there until about 1579. Lassus was to be one of the principal influences on the development of his musical style.

By 1584 he had returned to Venice, where he became principal organist at St Mark's Basilica in 1585, after Claudio Merulo left the post; following his uncle's death the following year he took the post of principal composer as well. Also after his uncle's death he began editing much of the older man's music, which would otherwise have been lost; Andrea evidently had had little inclination to publish his own music, but Giovanni's opinion of it was sufficiently high that he devoted much of his own time to compiling and editing it for publication.

Gabrieli's career rose further when he took the additional post of organist at the Scuola Grande di San Rocco, another post he retained for his entire life. San Rocco was the most prestigious and wealthy of all the Venetian confraternities, and second only to San Marco itself in the splendor of its musical establishment. Some of the most renowned singers and instrumentalists in Italy performed there and a vivid description of its musical activity survives in the travel memoirs of the English writer Thomas Coryat. Much of his music was written specifically for that location, although he probably composed even more for San Marco.

Though Gabrieli composed in many of the forms current at the time, he preferred sacred vocal and instrumental music. All of his secular vocal music is relatively early in his career; he never wrote lighter forms, such as dances; and later he concentrated on sacred vocal and instrumental music that exploited sonority for maximum effect. Among the innovations credited to him – and while he was not always the first to use them, he was the most famous of his period to do so – were dynamics; specifically notated instrumentation (as in the famous Sonata pian' e forte); and massive forces arrayed in multiple, spatially separated groups, an idea which was to be the genesis of the Baroque concertato style, and which spread quickly to northern Europe, both by the report of visitors to Venice and by Gabrieli's students, which included Hans Leo Hassler and Heinrich Schütz.

Like composers before and after him, he would use the unusual layout of the San Marco church, with its two choir lofts facing each other, to create striking spatial effects. Most of his pieces are written so that a choir or instrumental group will first be heard on one side, followed by a response from the musicians on the other side; often there was a third group situated on a stage near the main altar in the center of the church. While this polychoral style had been extant for decades (Adrian Willaert may have made use of it first, at least in Venice) Gabrieli pioneered the use of carefully specified groups of instruments and singers, with precise directions for instrumentation, and in more than two groups. The acoustics were and are such in the church that instruments, correctly positioned, could be heard with perfect clarity at distant points. Thus instrumentation which looks strange on paper, for instance a single string player set against a large group of brass instruments, can be made to sound, in San Marco, in perfect balance. A fine example of these techniques can be seen in the scoring of In Ecclesiis.

Gabrieli's first motets were published alongside his uncle Andrea's compositions in his 1587 volume of Concerti. These pieces show much influence of his uncle's style in the use of dialogue and echo effects. There are low and high choirs and the difference between their pitches is marked by the use of instrumental accompaniment. The motets published in Giovanni's 1597 Sacrae Symphoniae seem to move away from this technique of close antiphony towards a model in which musical material is not simply echoed, but developed by successive choral entries. Some motets, such as Omnes Gentes developed the model almost to its limits. In these motets, instruments are an integral part of the performance, and only the choirs marked "Capella" are to be performed by singers for each part.

Sonata pian' e forte was written by Giovanni Gabrieli, an Italian composer and organist in 1597.This is the earliest known piece of music to call for specific brass instruments. “Sonata pian’e forte” means an instrumental piece using soft and loud dynamics. A more technical definition of this is a Venetian polychoral style which arose from architectural peculiarities with regards to St Mark's Basilica. Sonata (at this time) means a piece for instruments. It was probably written to be played as part of a Catholic service at St Mark's, Venice. It was written for 8 instruments divided into 2 groups of 4 and placed in opposing galleries in the cathedral.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Gabrieli).

Although originally composed for Viola, Sackbuts & Double Choir (SATB + TTTB), I created this Interpretation of the Sonata "Pian e Forte (Ch. 175) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, English Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Ajoutée par magataganm le 2020-05-23



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Cette partition est associée ą la collection de magataganm :
flûte
flûte
Dispositions Flute
Liste des partitions :
› Élévation from 30 Pièces pour Orgue for Flute & Strings
› "Matribus suis dixerunt" for Woodwind Quintet
› Élégie for Flute & Strings
› "2 Alma Redemptoris Mater" for Woodwinds & Strings - Vents et Quintet ą cordes
› "3 Gradualia" for Winds & Strings - Vents & Orchestre Cordes
› "A Christmas Air" for Flutes & Harp - Flute et Harpe
› "A Cup of Tea" Reel for Flute - Flūte seule
› "A Dieu Celle" for Woodwind Sextet - Sextuor ą vent.
› "A Pretty Maid Milking the Cow" for Flute, Oboe & Harp - Flūte, Hautbois, Harpe
› "A Swiss Melody" for Flute Quartet - Quatuor de Flūtes






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