adblocktest
Free sheet music
My account (login)



LIBRARY

Gabrieli, Giovanni Giovanni Gabrieli
Italia Italia
(1557 - 1612)
36 sheet music
16 MP3
22 MIDI







"For 20 years we provide a free and legal service for free sheet music.

If you use and like Free-scores.com, thank you to consider support donation.

About / Member testimonies


Orchestra - band Sheet music Winds & String Orchestra Giovanni Gabrieli
Gabrieli, Giovanni: "Hodie Christus natus est" for Winds & Strings

"Hodie Christus natus est" for Winds & Strings
Ch. 40
Giovanni Gabrieli




Annotate this sheet music
Note the level :
Note the interest :


ListenDownload MP3 : "Hodie Christus natus est" (Ch. 40) for Winds & Strings 1x 6x ViewDownload PDF : "Hodie Christus natus est" (Ch. 40) for Winds & Strings (16 pages - 557.8 Ko)0x
 

 
Now that you have this PDF score, member's artist are waiting for a feedback from you in exchange of this free access.

Please log in or create a free account so you can :





leave your comment
notate the skill level of this score
assign an heart (and thus participate in improving the relevance of the ranking)
add this score to your library
add your audio or video interpretation


Log in or sign up for free
and participate in the Free-scores.com community


ViewDownload PDF : Bass (63 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Bassoon (60.19 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Cello (63.94 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : English Horn (60.46 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : French Horn (60.54 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Oboe (59.49 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Viola (65.28 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Violin 1 (64.92 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Violin 2 (65.41 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Flute (60.5 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Full Score (426.75 Ko)



Composer :Giovanni GabrieliGiovanni Gabrieli (1557 - 1612)
Instrumentation :

Winds & String Orchestra

Style :

Renaissance

Arranger :
Publisher :
Giovanni GabrieliMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Copyright :Public Domain
Giovanni Gabrieli (c. 1554/57 – 1612) was an Italian composer and organist. He was one of the most influential musicians of his time, and represents the culmination of the style of the Venetian School, at the time of the shift from Renaissance to Baroque idioms.

Gabrieli was born in Venice. He was one of five children, and his father came from the region of Carnia and went to Venice shortly before Giovanni's birth. While not much is known about Giovanni's early life, he probably studied with his uncle, the composer Andrea Gabrieli, who was employed at St Mark's Basilica from the 1560s until his death in 1585. Giovanni may indeed have been brought up by his uncle, as is implied by the dedication to his 1587 book of concerti, in which he described himself as "little less than a son" to his uncle.

Giovanni also went to Munich to study with the renowned Orlando de Lassus at the court of Duke Albert V; most likely he stayed there until about 1579. Lassus was to be one of the principal influences on the development of his musical style.

By 1584 he had returned to Venice, where he became principal organist at St Mark's Basilica in 1585, after Claudio Merulo left the post; following his uncle's death the following year he took the post of principal composer as well. Also after his uncle's death he began editing much of the older man's music, which would otherwise have been lost; Andrea evidently had had little inclination to publish his own music, but Giovanni's opinion of it was sufficiently high that he devoted much of his own time to compiling and editing it for publication.

Gabrieli's career rose further when he took the additional post of organist at the Scuola Grande di San Rocco, another post he retained for his entire life. San Rocco was the most prestigious and wealthy of all the Venetian confraternities, and second only to San Marco itself in the splendor of its musical establishment. Some of the most renowned singers and instrumentalists in Italy performed there and a vivid description of its musical activity survives in the travel memoirs of the English writer Thomas Coryat. Much of his music was written specifically for that location, although he probably composed even more for San Marco.

Though Gabrieli composed in many of the forms current at the time, he preferred sacred vocal and instrumental music. All of his secular vocal music is relatively early in his career; he never wrote lighter forms, such as dances; and later he concentrated on sacred vocal and instrumental music that exploited sonority for maximum effect. Among the innovations credited to him – and while he was not always the first to use them, he was the most famous of his period to do so – were dynamics; specifically notated instrumentation (as in the famous Sonata pian' e forte); and massive forces arrayed in multiple, spatially separated groups, an idea which was to be the genesis of the Baroque concertato style, and which spread quickly to northern Europe, both by the report of visitors to Venice and by Gabrieli's students, which included Hans Leo Hassler and Heinrich Schütz.

Like composers before and after him, he would use the unusual layout of the San Marco church, with its two choir lofts facing each other, to create striking spatial effects. Most of his pieces are written so that a choir or instrumental group will first be heard on one side, followed by a response from the musicians on the other side; often there was a third group situated on a stage near the main altar in the center of the church. While this polychoral style had been extant for decades (Adrian Willaert may have made use of it first, at least in Venice) Gabrieli pioneered the use of carefully specified groups of instruments and singers, with precise directions for instrumentation, and in more than two groups. The acoustics were and are such in the church that instruments, correctly positioned, could be heard with perfect clarity at distant points. Thus instrumentation which looks strange on paper, for instance a single string player set against a large group of brass instruments, can be made to sound, in San Marco, in perfect balance. A fine example of these techniques can be seen in the scoring of In Ecclesiis.

Hodie Christus natus est (Latin for "Today Christ is born") is a Gregorian chant sung at Christmas. It exists in various versions.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Gabrieli).

Although originally composed for Double Choir (SSATB + ATBBB), I created this Interpretation of the "Hodie Christus natus est" (Christ is born this day) for Winds (Flute, Oboe, English Horn, French Horn & Bassoon) & Strings (2 Violins, Viola, Cello & Bass).
Added by magataganm the 2020-05-23


0 comment





Report problem


This sheet music is part of the collection of magataganm :
Flute
flûte
Flute Arrangements
Sheet music list :
› Élévation from 30 Pièces pour Orgue for Flute & Strings
› "Matribus suis dixerunt" for Woodwind Quintet
› Élégie for Flute & Strings
› "2 Alma Redemptoris Mater" for Woodwinds & Strings - Woodwinds and String quintet
› "3 Gradualia" for Winds & Strings - Winds & String Orchestra
› "A Christmas Air" for Flutes & Harp - Flute and Harp
› "A Cup of Tea" Reel for Flute - Flute solo
› "A Dieu Celle" for Woodwind Sextet - Wind Sextet
› "A Pretty Maid Milking the Cow" for Flute, Oboe & Harp - Flute, Oboe, Harp
› "A Swiss Melody" for Flute Quartet - Flute Quartet




Cookies allow us to personalize content and ads, to provide social media-related features and analyze our traffic. We also share information on the use of our site with our social media partners, advertising and analytics, which can combine them with other information you have provided to them or collected in your use of their services.
Learn more and set cookiesClose