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Gluck, Christoph Willibald Christoph Willibald Gluck
Germany Germany
(1714 - 1787)
106 sheet music
118 MP3
8 MIDI



Arrangers : › Gluck, Christoph Willibald Original (1)
› Bass, Roderich (1)
› Boehm, Theobald (1)
› Dewagtere, Bernard (4)
› Hermann, Friedrich (1)
› Kok, Henk (1)
› Magatagan, Mike (2)

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Flute Sheet music Flute and Piano Christoph Willibald Gluck
Gluck, Christoph Willibald: Aria: "Che farò senza Euridice?" from "Orfeo ed Euridice"  for Flute & Piano.

Aria: "Che farò senza Euridice?" from "Orfeo ed Euridice" for Flute & Piano.
Wq 30 Act III Scene I
Christoph Willibald Gluck




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Composer :Christoph Willibald GluckChristoph Willibald Gluck (1714 - 1787)
Instrumentation :

Flute and Piano

  1 other version
Style :

Romantic

Arranger :
Publisher :
Christoph Willibald GluckMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Date :1762
Copyright :Public Domain
Christoph Willibald (Ritter von) Gluck (1714 – 1787) was a composer of Italian and French opera in the early classical period. Born in the Upper Palatinate and raised in Bohemia, both part of the Holy Roman Empire, he gained prominence at the Habsburg court at Vienna. There he brought about the practical reform of opera's dramaturgical practices for which many intellectuals had been campaigning. With a series of radical new works in the 1760s, among them Orfeo ed Euridice and Alceste, he broke the stranglehold that Metastasian opera seria had enjoyed for much of the century. Gluck introduced more drama by using simpler recitative and cutting the usually long da capo aria. His later operas have half the length of a typical baroque opera.

The strong influence of French opera encouraged Gluck to move to Paris in November 1773. Fusing the traditions of Italian opera and the French (with rich chorus) into a unique synthesis, Gluck wrote eight operas for the Parisian stage. Iphigénie en Tauride (1779) was a great success and is generally acknowledged to be his finest work. Though he was extremely popular and widely credited with bringing about a revolution in French opera, Gluck's mastery of the Parisian operatic scene was never absolute, and after the poor reception of his Echo et Narcisse (1779), he left Paris in disgust and returned to Vienna to live out the remainder of his life.

Gluck had long pondered the fundamental problem of form and content in opera. He thought both of the main Italian operatic genres, opera buffa and opera seria, had strayed too far from what opera should really be and seemed unnatural. Opera buffa had long lost its original freshness. Its jokes were threadbare and the repetition of the same characters made them seem no more than stereotypes. In opera seria, the singing was devoted to superficial effects and the content was uninteresting and fossilised. As in opera buffa, the singers were effectively absolute masters of the stage and the music, decorating the vocal lines so floridly that audiences could no longer recognise the original melody. Gluck wanted to return opera to its origins, focusing on human drama and passions and making words and music of equal importance.

Gluck's reformist ballet Don Juan become popular however, a more important work was soon to follow. On 5 October 1762, Orfeo ed Euridice was given its first performance, on a libretto by Calzabigi, set to music by Gluck. Gluck tried to achieve a noble, Neo-Classical or "beautiful simplicity". The dances were arranged by Angiolini and the title role was taken by Guadagni, a catalytic force in Gluck's reform, renowned for his unorthodox acting and singing style. Orfeo, which has never left the standard repertory, showed the beginnings of Gluck's reforms. His idea was to make the drama of the work more important than the star singers who performed it, and to do away with dry recitative (recitativo secco, accompanied only by continuo) that broke up the action. In 1765 Melchior Grimm published "Poème lyrique", an influential article for the Encyclopédie on lyric and opera librettos.

Although only half of his work survived after a fire in 1809, Gluck's musical legacy includes approximately 35 complete full-length operas plus around a dozen shorter operas and operatic introductions, as well as numerous ballets and instrumental works. His reforms influenced Mozart, particularly his opera Idomeneo (1781). He left behind a flourishing school of disciples in Paris, who would dominate the French stage throughout the Revolutionary and Napoleonic period. As well as Salieri, they included Sacchini, Cherubini, Méhul and Spontini. His greatest French admirer would be Hector Berlioz, whose epic Les Troyens may be seen as the culmination of the Gluckian tradition. Though Gluck wrote no operas in German, his example influenced the German school of opera, particularly Carl Maria von Weber and Richard Wagner, whose concept of music drama was not so far removed from Gluck's own.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christoph_Willibald_Gluc k).

Although originally written for Opera, I created this interpretation of the Aria: "Che farò senza Euridice?" from "Orfeo ed Euridice" (Wq 30 Act III Scene I) for Flute & Piano.
Sheet central :Orfeo ed Euridice (23 sheet music)
Added by magataganm the 2020-06-08


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This sheet music is part of the collection of magataganm :
Flute
flûte
Flute Arrangements
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