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Paisiello, Giovanni Giovanni Paisiello
Italia Italia
(1740 - 1816)
9 sheet music
5 MP3
1 MIDI







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Violin Sheet music String Quartet Giovanni Paisiello
Paisiello, Giovanni: Capriccio in D Major  for String Quartet

Capriccio in D Major for String Quartet
Giovanni Paisiello




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ViewDownload PDF : Cello (123.86 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Viola (143.15 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Violin 1 (159.55 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Violin 2 (139.33 Ko)
ViewDownload PDF : Full Score (488.42 Ko)



Composer :Giovanni PaisielloGiovanni Paisiello (1740 - 1816)
Instrumentation :

String Quartet

Style :

Classical

Arranger :
Publisher :
Giovanni PaisielloMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Copyright :Public Domain
Giovanni Paisiello (1740 – 1816) was an Italian composer of the Classical era, and was the most popular opera composer of the late 1700s. His music was praised by Haydn and Beethoven and an operatic influence on Mozart and Rossini.

Paisiello was born in Taranto in the Apulia region and educated by the Jesuits there. He became known for his beautiful singing voice and in 1754 was sent to the Conservatorio di S. Onofrio at Naples, where he studied under Francesco Durante, and eventually became assistant master. For the theatre of the Conservatorio, which he left in 1763, he wrote some intermezzi, one of which attracted so much notice that he was invited to write two operas, La Pupilla and Il Mondo al Rovescio, for Bologna, and a third, Il Marchese di Tidipano, for Rome.

His reputation now firmly established, he settled for some years at Naples, where, despite the popularity of Niccolò Piccinni, Domenico Cimarosa and Pietro Guglielmi, of whose triumphs he was bitterly jealous, he produced a series of highly successful operas, one of which, L'ldolo cinese, made a deep impression upon the Neapolitan public. The young Mozart met him in Bologna in 1771. Paisiello introduced Mozart to Italian opera which would become the epitome of Mozart's music.

In 1772 Paisiello began to write church music, and composed a requiem for Gennara di Borbone, of the reigning dynasty. In the same year he married Cecilia Pallini, and the marriage was a happy one. In 1776 Paisiello was invited by the empress Catherine II of Russia to St. Petersburg, where he remained for eight years, producing, among other charming works, his masterpiece, Il barbiere di Siviglia, which soon attained a European reputation. The fate of this opera marks an epoch in the history of Italian art; for with it the gentle suavity cultivated by the masters of the 18th century died out to make room for the dazzling brilliance of a later period.

Paisiello left Russia in 1784, and, after producing Il Re Teodoro at Vienna, entered the service of Ferdinand IV of Naples, where he composed many of his best operas, including Nina and La Molinara. The English tenor Michael Kelly witnessed another meeting between Paisiello and Mozart. Mozart kissed his hand as a sign of admiration. After many vicissitudes, resulting from political and dynastic changes, he was invited to Paris (1802) by Napoleon, whose favor he had won five years previously by composing a march for the funeral of General Hoche. Napoleon treated him munificently, while cruelly neglecting two more famous composers, Luigi Cherubini and Etienne Méhul, to whom the new favorite transferred the hatred he had formerly borne to Cimarosa, Guglielmi and Piccinni.

Paisiello conducted the music of the court in the Tuileries with a stipend of 10,000 francs and 4,800 for lodging, but he entirely failed to conciliate the Parisian public, who received his opera Proserpine so coldly that, in 1803, he requested and with some difficulty obtained permission to return to Italy, upon the plea of his wife's ill health. On his arrival at Naples Paisiello was reinstated in his former appointments by Joseph Bonaparte and Joachim Murat, but he had taxed his genius beyond its strength, and was unable to meet the demands now made upon it for new ideas. His prospects, too, were precarious. The power of the Bonaparte family was tottering to its fall; and Paisiello's fortunes fell with it. The death of his wife in 1815 tried him severely. His health failed rapidly, and constitutional jealousy of the popularity of others was a source of worry and vexation.

Paisiello is known to have composed 94 operas, which are known for their gracefully beautiful melodies. Perhaps the best-known tune he ever wrote is "Nel cor più non mi sento" from La Molinara, immortalized when Beethoven composed variations based on it. Another favourite vocal piece is "Chi vuol la zingarella" from I zingari in fiesta, that vividly portrays the scene of an attractive gypsy girl with its dramatic music. Paisiello also wrote a great deal of church music, including eight masses; as well as fifty-one instrumental compositions and many stand-alone songs. He also composed the Inno al Re, the national anthem of the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies. Manuscript scores of many of his operas were presented to the library of the British Museum by Domenico Dragonetti.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giovanni_Paisiello).

Although originally composed for Violin & Piano, I created this Interpretation of the Capriccio in D Major for String Quartet (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Added by magataganm the 2019-12-09


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This sheet music is part of the collection of magataganm :
Viola Arrangements

Viola Arrangements
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Violin Series, Third Edition: Orchestral Excerpts
Violin Series, Third Edition: Orchestral Excerpts
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