adblocktest
Free sheet music
My account (login)



LIBRARY

Campbell,Thomas  Campbell,Thomas
United Kingdom United Kingdom
(1777 - 1844)
1 sheet music






"For 18 years we provide a free and legal service for free sheet music.

If you use and like Free-scores.com, thank you to consider support donation.

About / Member testimonies


And Can It Be

And Can It Be
Campbell,Thomas




Annotate this sheet music
Note the level :
Note the interest :


ViewDownload PDF : Complete sheet music (4 pages - 328.91 Ko)222x
 

 
Now that you have this PDF score, member's artist are waiting for a feedback from you in exchange of this free access.

Please log in or create a free account so you can :





leave your comment
notate the skill level of this score
assign an heart (and thus participate in improving the relevance of the ranking)
add this score to your library
add your audio or video interpretation


Log in or sign up for free
and participate in the Free-scores.com community



Composer : Campbell,ThomasCampbell,Thomas (1777 - 1844)
Instrumentation :

Piano solo

Style :

Hymn

Arranger : Campbell,ThomasZisi, Matthew
Copyright :Copyright © Matthew Zisi
Stirring arrangement of And Can It Be, perfect for prelude, offertory, or other special service music.
Added by crosby3145 the 2017-12-28


0 comment





Report problem


This sheet music is part of the collection of crosby3145 :
Love Divine and Nine Other Hymns by Charles Wesley

There’s a reason statistics are so big in baseball. Numbers can be very telling. 50 home runs in a season tells you that a guy had a great year. 700 in a career tells you the guy had several great years. Same with 300 wins, 3,000 strikeouts, and 3,000 hits. The players who hit these milestones are the greatest of all time.
Well, Charles Wesley has a similar statistic. During his lifetime, he published more than 300 hymns. More than 3,000, even. By his death at age 80, he had published some 6,000 hymns! Even if he wrote quickly, 6,000 is a staggering amount, one that must have taken a ton of time to come up with. Only passion could cause a man to put that much effort into something, and for Wesley, passion it certainly was. It was a passionate love of God.
Charles Wesley was born December 18, 1807, in Epworth, Lincolnshire, England. He was the 18th—yes, 18th—child of Samuel and Susanna Wesley. The reverend Samuel Wesley was rector at Epworth. The young Wesley, along with his brother John, studied at Westminster School and later at Oxford University. While at Oxford, he formed a prayer group in 1727. His brother would join it two years later, and it was from this group that the Methodists were formed. The name “Methodist” started much like the term Christian, a term of ridicule that was quickly embraced for what it meant. In the Wesleys’ case , Methodist referred to their methodical and detailed Bible study—which probably gave them a greater knowledge of the Bible than all their peers who examined it less carefully. Charles graduated in 1735 and was ordained into the Church of England.
That same year, Charles and John were asked to come to the new colony of Georgia in the United States by James Oglethorpe, its founder. Charles was officially Secretary of Indian Affairs but also served as chaplain at Fort Frederica. He and John had trouble gaining the favors of settlers in Georgia, and when Charles left in 1736, he never would return.
This visit to America, however, lay the foundation for Charles and John’s conversion to Christianity. Conversion, you say? Charles was ordained in the Church of England! Wasn’t he already a Christian? Nominally, yes, but he was missing something—something the Moravians showed him. Charles and John first met the Moravians on a ship on the way to America and were impressed at the Moravians’ faith during a storm. On their return to London, they found some in England and met with them. Charles was offended when one shook his head after Charles told him he thought the virtue of his works would lead him to Heaven. He did not forget the experience, though, and the encounter paved the way for a change in his heart. On May 21, 1738, he was reading Martin Luther’s Commentary on Galatians when he finally discovered the truth—no works he did could make up for the sins he had committed which doomed him to Hell. Only by placing his faith in Jesus, Whose sacrifice took the place of the punishment sinners so richly deserve, could Charles find eternal life. He placed his faith in God, that day, and as his brother wrote, “I received the surprising news that my brother had found rest to his soul.”
Buoyed by his newfound faith, Charles began writing hymns. He also started preaching, but, after only a year, was kicked out of the church at Islington by the vicar, who noted that the churchwardens did not like Charles’s sermons. Unfazed, Charles took a page out of George Whitefield’s book and began preaching in fields in 1739. With his brother John, he began to journey around England, preaching the Gospel wherever he went and writing hymns at the same time.
Charles was married in 1749 to Miss Sarah Gwynne, with whom he lived happily the next twenty years (until her death). In 1756, Charles ceased his journeys around England, focusing then on churches in Bristol and London. Bristol was his home until 1771, when he moved to London and began ministering (as he had done in his younger days) to the prisoners at Newgate. He and John disagreed about Methodism’s split from the Church of England—Charles was so firmly committed to the Anglican Church, he declared that he would be buried in an Anglican churchyard. However, the disagreement did not ruin the brothers’ relationship, and they were on good terms all their days. Charles died in London March 29, 1788, but his legacy lives on today in hymnals, each of which bears multiple hymns by him.
Perhaps this line from one of Charles’s hymns best describes how and why he wrote so many. “The Holy Ghost in part we know, For with us He resides, Our whole of good to Him we owe, Whom by His grace he guides, He doth our virtuous thoughts inspire, The evil he averts, And every seed of good desire, He planted in our hearts.” His most famous hymn expresses a desire which came true six times over, if you count each hymn as a tongue—“O for a thousand tongues to sing my great Redeemer's praise, the glories of my God and King, the triumphs of his grace!”
Obviously, a collection of ten contains just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to Wesley’s output. Additionally, some of his famous hymns (like “O for a Thousand Tongues”) are pretty short, so I didn’t want to make stand-alone arrangements of those. However, it was pretty easy to find ten great hymns by him for this collection. “Lo, He Comes with Clouds Descending” is a majestic portrayal of the future Second Coming of Christ. “Ye Servants of God, Your Master Proclaim” restates God’s command which is manifest throughout the Bible. “Soldiers of Christ Arise” is the logical conclusion of Paul’s “put on the whole armor of God” analogy in Ephesians, exhorting us to live for Christ our Savior. Other hymns included in this collection are “Arise, My Soul, Arise,” “And Can It Be,” “Jesus, Lover of My Soul,” “Love Divine,” “Rejoice – the Lord Is King!,” “Christ the Lord Is Risen Today,” and “I Want a Principle Within.”
Some of these arrangements were written a year or more ago. Others were written within the last couple weeks. A couple of the tunes are by great classical composers (Michael Haydn and Louis Spohr), and I must admit I was channeling my inner Liszt as I wrote some of these. I hope, though, that these arrangements are a blessing to you, and that the congregation or audience you play them for thinks through the words as they hear you play the tunes. Enjoy!
NOTE: Arise, My Soul, Arise is already listed in another collection. See At Calvary! and Nine Other Great Hymns of the Faith by Daniel B. Towner to find it.

Sheet music list :
Campbell,Thomas : And Can It Be
Anonymous : Christ the Lord Is Risen Today
Spohr, Louis : I Want a Principle Within
Marsh, Simeon Bulkley : Jesus, Lover of My Soul
Anonymous : Lo! He Comes with Clouds Descending
Zundel, John : Love Divine
Darwall, John : Rejoice - the Lord Is King!
Elvey, George Job : Soldiers of Christ, Arise
Haydn, Johann Michael : Ye Servants of God, Your Master Proclaim



Sheet music sales from Europe
298 scores found for "And Can It Be"

 The Beatles Sheet Music Collection - Pvg
2 sellers
 
The Beatles Sheet Music Collection - Pvg
Piano, Vocal and Guitar
Hal Leonard
38.50 EUR - Sold by Woodbrass
Pre-shipment lead time: 24 hours - In Stock
Heumann, Hans Günter : The Entertainer
2 sellers
Heumann, Hans Günter : The Entertainer
Piano solo [Sheet music]
Schott
21.50 EUR - Sold by Note4Piano
Pre-shipment lead time: 24 hours - In Stock
Only 1 left in stock, order soon !


More shop results >>
Sheet music sales from USA
4988 scores found for "And Can It Be"

Complete Sonatas for Pianoforte I
 
 
Complete Sonatas for Pianoforte I
Piano solo
Barenreiter
$37.95 - See more - Buy online
Pre-shipment lead time: 24 hours - In Stock
Complete Sonatas for Pianoforte III
 
 
Complete Sonatas for Pianoforte III
Piano solo
Barenreiter
$37.95 - See more - Buy online
Pre-shipment lead time: 24 hours - In Stock
Complete Sonatas for Pianoforte II
 
 
Complete Sonatas for Pianoforte II
Piano solo
Barenreiter
$37.95 - See more - Buy online
Pre-shipment lead time: 24 hours - In Stock


More shop results >>

Cookies allow us to personalize content and ads, to provide social media-related features and analyze our traffic. We also share information on the use of our site with our social media partners, advertising and analytics, which can combine them with other information you have provided to them or collected in your use of their services.
Learn more and set cookiesClose