BIBLIOTHÈQUE
Brahms, Johannes Johannes Brahms
Allemagne Allemagne
(1833 - 1897)

508 Partitions
323 MP3
100 MIDI





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Partitions Cor Cor et Cordes Johannes Brahms
Brahms, Johannes:

"Herr, lehre doch mich" from "Ein Deutsches Requiem" for Oboe & Strings
Op. 45 No. 3
Johannes Brahms




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VoirTélécharger PDF : "Herr, lehre doch mich" from "Ein Deutsches Requiem" (Op. 45 No. 3) for Oboe & Strings (12 pages - 278.44 Ko)12x
VoirTélécharger PDF : Bass (67.62 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Violoncelle (65.72 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : French Cor (66.18 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Alto 1 (65.64 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Alto 2 (66 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Violon 1 (67.94 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Violon 2 (66.23 Ko)
VoirTélécharger PDF : Conducteur complet (182.75 Ko)
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EcouterTélécharger MP3 : "Herr, lehre doch mich" from "Ein Deutsches Requiem" (Op. 45 No. 3) for Oboe & Strings 6x 32x



Compositeur :Johannes BrahmsJohannes Brahms (1833 - 1897)
Instrumentation :

Cor et Cordes

Genre :

Classique

Arrangeur :
Editeur :
Johannes BrahmsMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Droit d'auteur :Public Domain
Johannes Brahms (1833 – 1897) was a German composer, pianist, and conductor of the Romantic period. Born in Hamburg into a Lutheran family, Brahms spent much of his professional life in Vienna. His reputation and status as a composer are such that he is sometimes grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven as one of the "Three Bs" of music, a comment originally made by the nineteenth-century conductor Hans von Bülow. Brahms composed for symphony orchestra, chamber ensembles, piano, organ, and voice and chorus. A virtuoso pianist, he premiered many of his own works. He worked with some of the leading performers of his time, including the pianist Clara Schumann and the violinist Joseph Joachim (the three were close friends). Many of his works have become staples of the modern concert repertoire. An uncompromising perfectionist, Brahms destroyed some of his works and left others unpublished.

Brahms has been considered, by his contemporaries and by later writers, as both a traditionalist and an innovator. His music is firmly rooted in the structures and compositional techniques of the Classical masters. While many contemporaries found his music too academic, his contribution and craftsmanship have been admired by subsequent figures as diverse as Arnold Schoenberg and Edward Elgar. The diligent, highly constructed nature of Brahms's works was a starting point and an inspiration for a generation of composers. Embedded within his meticulous structures, however, are deeply romantic motifs.

A German Requiem, to Words of the Holy Scriptures, Op. 45 (German: Ein deutsches Requiem, nach Worten der heiligen Schrift) by Johannes Brahms, is a large-scale work for chorus, orchestra, a soprano and a baritone soloist, composed between 1865 and 1868. It comprises seven movements, which together last 65 to 80 minutes, making this work Brahms's longest composition. A German Requiem is sacred but non-liturgical, and unlike a long tradition of the Latin Requiem, A German Requiem, as its title states, is a Requiem in the German language.

Brahms's mother died in February 1865, a loss that caused him much grief and may well have inspired Ein deutsches Requiem. Brahms's lingering feelings over Robert Schumann's death in July 1856 may also have been a motivation, though his reticence about such matters makes this uncertain.

His original conception was for a work of six movements; according to their eventual places in the final version, these were movements I–IV and VI–VII. By the end of April 1865, Brahms had completed the first, second, and fourth movements. The second movement used some previously abandoned musical material written in 1854, the year of Schumann's mental collapse and attempted suicide, and of Brahms's move to Düsseldorf to assist Clara Schumann and her young children.

Brahms completed all but what is now the fifth movement by August 1866. Johann Herbeck conducted the first three movements in Vienna on 1 December 1867. This partial premiere went poorly due to a misunderstanding in the timpanist's score. Sections marked as pf were played as f or ff, essentially drowning out the rest of the ensemble in the fugal section of the third movement. The first performance of the six movements premiered in the Bremen Cathedral six months later on Good Friday, 10 April 1868, with Brahms conducting and Julius Stockhausen as the baritone soloist. The performance was a great success and marked a turning point in Brahms's career.

In May 1868 Brahms composed an additional movement, which became the fifth movement within the final work. The new movement, which was scored for soprano soloist and choir, was first sung in Zürich on 12 September 1868 by Ida Suter-Weber, with Friedrich Hegar conducting the Tonhalle Orchester Zürich. The final, seven-movement version of A German Requiem was premiered in Leipzig on 18 February 1869 with Carl Reinecke conducting the Gewandhaus Orchestra and Chorus, and soloists Emilie Bellingrath-Wagner and Franz Krückl.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_German_Requiem_(Brahms )).

Although originally created for Orchestra & Organ, I created this Interpretation of the "Herr, lehre doch mich" (Lord, teach me) from "Ein Deutsches Requiem" (Op. 45 No. 3) for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, 2 Violas, 2 Cellos & Bass).
Ajoutée par magataganm, 11 Fév 2021
Partition centrale :Un requiem allemand (Ein deutsches Requiem), 45 (10 partitions)
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Cette partition est associée à la collection de magataganm :
Viola Arrangements


Liste des partitions :

› "Joy to the World" for String Quartet
› 'Élégie' for Viola & Harp - Alto et Harpe
› "Élégie" from "6 Études pour la Main Gauche" for String Quartet
› "Élévation ou Communion" from "L'Organiste Moderne" for String Quintet
› "Élévation" in D Major from 10 Pieces for Organ for String Quartet
› "3 Chants Sacrés" for Viola & Piano
› "Ach bleib bei uns, Herr Jesu Christ" for Viola
› "Albinoni's Adagio" for Viola & Harp - Alto et Harpe
› "Album leaf" from Lyric Pieces for String Quartet





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