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Tartini, Giuseppe Giuseppe Tartini
Italia Italia
(1692 - 1770)
48 sheet music
10 MP3
1 MIDI







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Tartini, Giuseppe: Fugue in G Major from "Sei Fughe" for Winds & Strings

Fugue in G Major from "Sei Fughe" for Winds & Strings
Giuseppe Tartini




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Composer :Giuseppe TartiniTartini, Giuseppe (1692 - 1770)
Instrumentation :

Winds & String Orchestra

Style :

Baroque

Arranger :
Publisher :
Giuseppe TartiniMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Key :G major
Copyright :Public Domain
Giuseppe Tartini (1692 – 1770) was an Italian Baroque composer and violinist. He was born in Pirano, a town on the peninsula of Istria, in the Republic of Venice (now in Slovenia) to Gianantonio – native of Florence – and Caterina Zangrando, a descendant of one of the oldest aristocratic Piranese families.

It appears Tartini's parents intended him to become a Franciscan friar and, in this way, he received basic musical training. He studied law at the University of Padua, where he became skilled at fencing. After his father's death in 1710, he married Elisabetta Premazore, a woman his father would have disapproved of because of her lower social class and age difference. Unfortunately, Elisabetta was a favorite of the powerful Cardinal Giorgio Cornaro, who promptly charged Tartini with abduction. Tartini fled Padua to go to the monastery of St. Francis in Assisi, where he could escape prosecution. While there, Tartini took up playing the violin.

Legend says when Tartini heard Francesco Maria Veracini's playing in 1716, he was impressed by it and dissatisfied with his own skill. He fled to Ancona and locked himself away in a room to practise, according to Charles Burney, "in order to study the use of the bow in more tranquility, and with more convenience than at Venice, as he had a place assigned him in the opera orchestra of that city". Tartini's skill improved tremendously and, in 1721, he was appointed Maestro di Cappella at the Basilica di Sant'Antonio in Padua, with a contract that allowed him to play for other institutions if he wished. In Padua he met and befriended fellow composer and theorist Francesco Antonio Vallotti.

Tartini was the first known owner of a violin made by Antonio Stradivari in 1715, which Tartini bestowed upon his student Salvini, who in turn gave it to the Polish composer and virtuoso violinist Karol Lipiński upon hearing him perform: the instrument is thus known as the Lipinski Stradivarius. Tartini also owned and played the Antonio Stradivarius violin ex-Vogelweith from 1711. Today, Tartini's most famous work is the "Devil's Trill Sonata", a solo violin sonata that requires a number of technically demanding double stop trills and is difficult even by modern standards. According to a legend embroidered upon by Madame Blavatsky, Tartini was inspired to write the sonata by a dream in which the Devil appeared at the foot of his bed playing the violin.

Almost all of Tartini's works are violin concerti (at least 135) and violin sonatas. Tartini's compositions include some sacred works such as a Miserere, composed between 1739 and 1741 at the request of Pope Clement XII, and a Stabat Mater, composed in 1769.[4] He also composed trio sonatas and a sinfonia in A. Tartini's music is problematic to scholars and editors because Tartini never dated his manuscripts, and he also revised works that had been published or even finished years before, making it difficult to determine when a work was written, when it was revised and what the extent of those revisions were. The scholars Minos Dounias and Paul Brainard have attempted to divide Tartini's works into periods based entirely on the stylistic characteristics of the music.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giuseppe_Tartini ).

Although originally written for Flute & Orchestra, I created this Interpretation of the Fugue in G Major from "Sei Fughe" for Winds (Flute, Oboe, Bb Clarinet, French Horn & Bassoon) and Strings (2 Violins, Viola, cello & Bass).
Source / Web :MuseScore
Added by magataganm the 2019-03-28


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This sheet music is part of the collection of magataganm :
Flute
flûte
Flute Arrangements
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› "3 Gradualia" for Winds & Strings - Winds & String Orchestra
› "A Christmas Air" for Flutes & Harp - Flute and Harp
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› "A Swiss Melody" for Flute Quartet - Flute Quartet
› "Abendlied" for Woodwind Quartet - Wind quartet
› "Ach bleib bei uns, Herr Jesu Christ" for Flute Duet - 2 flutes
› "Ad Te Levavi" for Brass & Strings - Winds & String Orchestra




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