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Bach, Johann Sebastian Johann Sebastian Bach
Germany Germany
(1685 - 1750)
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Bach, Johann Sebastian: Sonatina: "Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit" for Oboe & Strings

Sonatina: "Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit" for Oboe & Strings
BWV 106 No 1
Johann Sebastian Bach




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Composer :Johann Sebastian BachBach, Johann Sebastian (1685 - 1750)
Instrumentation :

Oboe solo, String quartet

Style :

Baroque

Arranger :
Publisher :
Johann Sebastian BachMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Copyright :Public Domain
Born on March 21, 1685, in Eisenach, Thuringia, Germany, Johann Sebastian Bach had a prestigious musical lineage and took on various organist positions during the early 18th century, creating famous compositions like "Toccata and Fugue in D minor." Some of his best-known compositions are the "Mass in B Minor," the "Brandenburg Concertos" and "The Well-Tempered Clavier." Bach died in Leipzig, Germany, on July 28, 1750. Today, he is considered one of the greatest Western composers of all time.

There can be little doubt that this is the best known and most admired of Bach's earliest cantatas. It could be argued that in later years Bach's art became a great deal more mature, but it hardly grew more profound. It is one of those art works that stands at the crossroads of time, seeming to look both forward and backwards. In the latter instance it is highly sectional, with little in the way of the extended, developed movements of the later years, it is lightly orchestrated, begins with a short introductory sinfonia and it draws principally upon chorales and biblical references with the minimum of added text. On the other hand, it is created from structural elements which operate across and unite movements, the writing is highly idiomatic and the musical architecture derives principally from the essence of the text.

It is a work of such depth and intensity that one can scarcely avoid speculating that the deceased for whose internment it was composed, had some personal connection with the twenty-two year old composer. Or perhaps it simply struck a chord that reminded him of the death of his own parents, scarcely more than a dozen years previously. But whatever the personal impact the occasion might have had on him, there is no disputing the depth and profundity which the emerging composer managed to elicit from the minimal lines of conventional text.

The segmented nature of this work makes it seem more complex than it really is. It falls into four basic movements thus: sinfonia, chorus (with solos), aria (becoming a duet) and closing chorale. The longest and most complex of the two hybrid movements is the second.

the Sonatina (sinfonia) is from his earliest essays into the cantata genre, Bach had been attracted to the notion of making the instrumental introduction an organic part of the total composition: see, for example, Cs 4 and 150. His choice of instruments for this work, two viola da gamba (perhaps most widely known for their later appearance in Brandenburg 6), two recorders and continuo together produce a sound that is today archaic and unworldly. Whether mourners in the first decade of the eighteenth century would have felt the same way cannot be known. But the soundscape is intimate, ethereal and totally suited to the processes of mourning and personal reflection upon the soul and character of the departed.

It is only twenty bars long but that is sufficient to establish the mood and ambience. The recorders play mostly in unison but when they do not, their differences are subtle but significant. For example, in bars 4, 5 and 6 the second instrument falls silent in the latter part of each bar, thereafter to reunite itself with its companion. The effect is a telling one of division and togetherness. In bar 7-8 the oscillation about two notes (f and e) has the effect of a slow, macabre trill. Even at this early stage, Bach's sensitivity to the subtleties of instrumentation was well developed; the details may seem trivial but they are artistically significant.

Although originally written for Flutes (2), Viola da Gambas (2) and Basso Continuo, I created this arrangement for Oboe & Strings (2 Violins, Viola & Cello).
Source / Web :MuseScore
Sheet central :Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit (8 sheet music)
Added by magataganm the 2018-12-08


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This sheet music is part of the collection of magataganm :
Viola Arrangements

Viola Arrangements
Sheet music list :
› "Joy to the World" for String Quartet
› 'Élégie' for Viola & Harp - Viola and Harp
› "3 Chants Sacrés" for Viola & Piano
› "Ach bleib bei uns, Herr Jesu Christ" for Viola
› "Albinoni's Adagio" for Viola & Harp - Viola and Harp
› "All They That See Him Laugh Him to Scorn" for Horn & Strings
› "All Through the Night" for Violin, Viola & Harp
› "Allemanda" from the Partita for Violin No. 2 for Viola - Viola
› "Alma Redemptoris Mater" for String Quartet
› "Am Tage Aller Seelen" for Viola & Harp




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