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Raff, Joachim Joachim Raff
Switzerland Switzerland
(1822 - 1882)
142 sheet music
22 MP3
7 MIDI







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Raff, Joachim: "Im Schilf" from 4 Pieces for Piano

"Im Schilf" from 4 Pieces for Piano
Op. 196 No. 1
Joachim Raff




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Composer :Joachim RaffRaff, Joachim (1822 - 1882)
Instrumentation :

Piano solo

Style :

Classical

Arranger :
Publisher :
Joachim RaffMagatagan, Mike (1960 - )
Date :1875
Copyright :Public Domain
Joseph Joachim Raff was born on 27 May 1822 in the small town of Lachen, on the shores of lake Zürich in Switzerland. His father, Joseph, was a native of Empfingen, in Württemberg, south west Germany. In 1811, Joseph Raff had fled south to avoid compulsory conscription into Napoleon's army. After spells as organist & music teacher in a monastery in Wettingen and also in Lucerne, he set himself up as a schoolmaster in Lachen. In time he married the daughter of the local cantonal president - Katharina Schmid. The Raff family was poor but young Joachim had a basic education from his father. The boy was later sent to the Rottenberg Gymnasium in his father’s native Württemberg to study philosophy, philology and mathematics before financial pressures on the family forced his return to Switzerland. He finished his education with two years at the Jesuit Seminary in Schwyz, where he carried off prizes in German, Latin and mathematics. When Raff left Schwyz in 1840 it was to return to Rapperswil, near Lachen, to begin work as a teacher. As a child, though, Raff had already shown great natural talent as a pianist, violinist and organist, performing at the Sunday concerts in the nearby spa of Nuolen. Having taught himself the rudiments of music, he began to compose too.

Many of Raff’s works were premiered in Wiesbaden, sometimes with Raff himself conducting, but his world-wide fame spread until he came to be regarded as one of the foremost composers of his day - the equal of Brahms and Wagner. His skill at orchestration was prodigious and his ability as a melodist was universally praised, but he was not without his critics. Their main charge was grounded on the accusation that Raff was a Vielschreiber - someone who wrote (too) much and was too unselfcritical. He was accused of being an eclectic whose style was a synthesis of other composers’ styles rather than being his own. They felt that Raff’s natural aptitude was for character and salon pieces, rather than the symphonies, concertos and chamber music which he continued to produce. Raff could be a blunt and tactless person, who revelled in argument and enjoyed confrontation. He did little to placate his critics, however, and with growing success tended to become arrogant. "He was too proud" wrote even his daughter Helene.

He died at 60 of a heart attack on the night of 24/25 June 1882 after several months of illness brought on by his heavy workload. His final years had brought him all the recognition and security he could have desired and he had been confident that posterity would continue to place him in the first rank. So confident, in fact, that he had neglected to provide for his family, assuming that royalties would continue to give them an ample income. Perhaps in writing the motto of his 6th. Symphony: "Lived, Struggled, Suffered, Fought, Died, Glorified", Raff was unconsciously penning what he hoped might be his own epitaph.

"In the reeds" is the first of four piano pieces in Raff's op.196 - the others being a Berceuse, a Novelette and an Impromptu. As its title suggests this Adagio con moto work is a tone painting of reeds gently blown by a breeze over water. As in Dans la nacelle a continuous figuration is used to good effect both to provide the atmosphere and as a base for the effective and memorable melody. It was written in the Winter of 1875 in Wiesbaden and published both in Leipzig and Berlin.

Source: Wikipedia (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Joachim_Raff).

I created this Transcription of the Etude "Im Schilf" from 4 Pieces for Piano (Op. 196 No. 1) for Piano.

Download the sheet music here: https://musescore.com/user/13216/scores/5634295
Source / Web :MuseScore
Added by magataganm the 2019-07-06


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This sheet music is part of the collection of magataganm :
Piano
Piano
Piano Arrangements
Sheet music list :
› Étude in Gb Major for Piano
› "2 Ave Regina" for Trumpet, Horn & Piano - Trumpet and Piano
› "2 Christmas Songs" for Piano - Piano solo
› "Agitation" from "Lieder ohne Worte" for Piano
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› "Allegra" for Bassoon & Piano - Bassoon, Piano
› "Allegro Appassionato" for Piano - Piano solo
› "Andante Grazioso" from "Lieder ohne Worte" for Piano
› "Après un Rêve" for Viola & Piano
› "Asturias (Leyenda)" from the Suite "Española" for Piano




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